Portuguese Denham Family


 

''When John Sevier attempted to organize the State of Franklin, there was living in the mountains of Eastern Tennessee a colony of dark-skinned, reddish-brown complexioned people, supposed to be of Moorish descent, who affiliated with neither whites nor blacks, and who called themselves Malungeons, and claimed to be of Portuguese descent.'' Will Allen Dromgoole

While no source for the above has been found, the pension applications of David and Harden Denham from Guilford County, North Carolia show they served under John Sevier during the Revolution it would certainly seem John Sevier was indeed familiar with the Portuguese. David and Harden Denham were born in the 1750s in Hanover/Louisa County, Virginia and are associated with the Joseph Goodman family.  Other Gibson names thought to be connected to the 'Melungeons' are found on the 1775 Petition of the Inhabitants of Washington District, as well as Sevier's  Petition of the inhabitants of the Western Country in December 1787 to form the State of Franklin.

''The Portuguese branch was for a long time a riddle, the existence of it being stoutly denied. It has at last, however, been traced to one "Denham", a Portuguese who married a Collins woman. It seems that every runaway or straggler of any kind whatever, passing through the country took up with abode temporarily or permanently, with the Melungeons, or as they were then called the Ridgemanites. They were harmless, social, and good-natured when well acquainted with one--although at first suspicious, distant, and morose. While they have never encouraged emigration to the Ridge they have sometimes been unable to prevent it.

Denham, it is supposed, came from one of the Spanish settlements lying further to the south. He settled on Mulberry Creek, and married a sister of Old Sol Collins. There is another story ,however, about Denham. It is said that the first Denham came as did the first Collins from North Carolina, and that he (or his ancestors) had been left upon the Carolina coast by some Portugese pirate vessel plying along the shore. When the English wrested the island of Jamaica from Spain in 1655, some fifteen hundred Spanish slaves fled to the mountains. Their number grew and their strength multiplied. ''   Will Allen Dromgoole


 

 

This is  the reseach of Billy Denham sent to me several years ago - contact Billy at   bgdenham@hotmail.com
 

Descendants of David Denham

Generation No. 1

1. DAVID 1 DENHAM was born Bef. 1740 in Portugal.

Children of DAVID DENHAM are:

2. i. DAVID2 DENHAM, b. 1754, Louisa County, VA.; d. June 14, 1850, Hancock County, Tennessee.

3. ii. HARDEN DENHAM, b. June 30, 1760, Hanover, Virginia, USA.

iii. CHARLES DENHAM, b. 1763.

Generation No. 2

2. DAVID2 DENHAM (DAVID1) was born 1754 in Louisa County, VA., and died June 14, 1850 in Hancock County, Tennessee. He married (1) UNKNOWN COLLINS, daughter of SOLOMAN SR. and EDY DICKERSON. She was born Bef. 1780. He married (2) FRANCES LUCAS September 1811 in Hawkins County, Tennessee. She was born 1776 in North Carolina.

Notes for DAVID DENHAM:

David served in the Militia during the American Revolution. He enlisted in Guilford County, NC. There was also a Harden Denham that also enlisted in Guilford County, NC. and served in the Revolutionary War. I cannot prove, but the weight of evidence indicates David and Harden were, at the least cousins, but in all probability they were brothers.  [*See Below - It is proven by Pension records they were indeed brothers]

April 25, 1809, David sold property in Washington County, N.C. (now Tennessee) to a Charles Denham. Rolen named one of his sons Charles. The ages make it highly probable that David and Charles were brothers.

The 1830 census of Claiborne County lists David Denham, age 55-100 and wife, age (36-55) and two daughters ages (10-24), three daughters age (under 10), one son age (10-24) and one son age (under 10).

Family members where listed as FPC, Free Persons of Color. They were living at Mulberry Gap, which later became Hancock County, TN. The ages of the boys correspond with the ages of Rolen (17) and Willoby (6).

1840 U.S. Census records only one Denham living in this general vicinity: David Denham, living in Claiborne County, TN., which borders Hancock County on the West. His age is given as between 55-100. Early census was only interested in numbers, not personal statistics. His wife's age was listed as between 36-55, one son between 10-24, four daughters between 10-24 and one daughter between 0-10 years of age.

His age (57) when he married Fanny, makes it almost certain that he is the David Denham that married a Collins woman before 1800, whose grandson, a blacksmith, reputed to be Portuguese, lived on Blackwater Creek. (Source: Grohse Manuscripts)

On the 1860 census of Hancock County/Mulberry Creek, TN. Fanny Denham (78) b. NC. was living with her Daughter-in-law Mildred Denham (35) b. TN. and her children: Nancy (14) b. TN., William (12) b. TN., Margaret (8) b. TN., twins Mary & Martha (6) b. VA. and Clementine (1) b. TN.

Note on Fanny's birth in NC.: The Western part of North Carolina became Tennessee in 1796.

The following is an effort to transcribe an application Fanny made to secure her dead husband's Revolutionary War Pension.

State of Tennessee, County of Hancock

On the 2nd day of July, 1856, personally appeared before the Justice of the Peace, FANNY DENHAM, a resident of the County of Hancock and State of Tennessee.

Age about 80 years, who being first duly sworn according to the law, doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the lump of the pension made by the act of Congress, passed February 3, 1853. That she is the widow of David Denham, who was a Private in the Company of Captain Leak and Colonel James Martin, in the Revolutionary War, about 1778 and 1779. She further declares that she was married to the said David Denham in September, 1811 in Hawkins County TN. by Thomas McKneely a minister of the gospel. That her husband, above said David Denham, died on or about 14th day of June 1850. and that she had remained a widow ever since that time and is now a widow and that her name before her said marriage was Fanny Lucas. That she now has said her husband never kept any records or writing of the dates and other facts concerning this said marriage. Nor does she believe any person is now alive that was present when they were married, as afore said, and she from her memory cannot name, simply states the facts from her recollection.

Signed (by a mark), Fanny Denham

The following an effort to transcribe the personal statements of William Standifer and Isaac Goin verifying the statement of Fanny Denham.

William Standifer and Isaac Goin, residence of Hancock County, State of Tennessee

Upon our oaths declare that the fore going declaration was signed and acknowledged by Fanny Denham in our presence and that we personally known David Denham in his lifetime, known that he is dead, know nothing of the marriage of the parties, but know that the maiden name of the said Fanny was LUCAS, that her and the said David Denham, who we understand and believe was a Revolutionary War soldier, lived many years together in the county, state and neighborhood where he died, as man and wife. So conducted and behaved and so reputed and respected by the neighbors generally up to the death of the said David Denham, and that since the death of the said David Denham that the said Fanny Denham has never again been married but has remained and is now a widow and that we believe from personal knowledge, and from what the applicant say's and from her age and past and circumstances known to us, that she is the person she represents herself to be and we have no interest in her claim.

Signed: William Standifer and Isaac Goin

She was allowed a pension from the U.S. Government executed July 2, 1856. Inscribed on the roll of pensioners at the rate of $26 dollars and .84 cents per annum.

Her and David is said to have raised a family of nine children (not named).

More About DAVID DENHAM and FRANCES LUCAS:

Marriage: September 1811, Hawkins County, Tennessee

Children of DAVID DENHAM and UNKNOWN COLLINS are:

i. DAVID3 DENHAM, b. Bef. 1794; m. UNKNOWN MULLINS.

Notes for DAVID DENHAM:

The Grohse Manuscripts report, "An old blacksmith, a Portuguese on Blackwater Creek, is as dark as a genuine African, yet has a peculiar tinge to his skin that is totally foreign to the Negro. He has a white wife, a Mullins woman, a descendant of English and Indian. The blacksmith is a Denham, grandson of the old Portuguese emigrant and a Collins woman..."

ii. PHILIP DENHAM, b. 1794, Tennessee; m. REBECCA GOIN, December 22, 1812, Grainger County, Tennessee.

Notes for PHILIP DENHAM:

Grohse Reel #3 under "Miscellaneous Information" states that "Philip Denham was Portuguese and lived in Hancock County in the 1800's."

It is by a preponderance of evidence that we list Philip as a son of David Denham.

More About PHILIP DENHAM and REBECCA GOIN:

Marriage: December 22, 1812, Grainger County, Tennessee

Children of DAVID DENHAM and FRANCES LUCAS are:

4. iii. ROLIN H.3 DENHAM, b. June 12, 1813, Tennessee.

5. iv. FETNEY DENHAM, b. 1815, Tennessee.

v. EVALINE DENHAM, b. 1818, Virginia.

Notes for EVALINE DENHAM:

There is no known husband or children attributed to Evaline either in census records or family history.

She is however listed on the U.S. Census 1850 Hancock County, TN.

Evaline Denham (33) and sister Fetney Denham (35) living with children, which are assumed Fetney's since they all appear with Fetney on the 1860 census without Evaline. Daughter Malissa E. (10), James M. (8), Maryann (6), Mandy (assumed to Manda or Amanda) Jane (4) and William (6/12).

vi. NANCY DENHAM, b. 1822.

6. vii. CAROLINE DENHAM, b. 1824.

7. viii. MILDRED DENHAM, b. 1826, Virginia.

8. ix. WILLOBY DENHAM, b. 1827, Hancock County, Tennessee.

3. HARDEN2 DENHAM (DAVID1)1 was born June 30, 1760 in Hanover, Virginia, USA1. He married (2) NANCY GOIN1 October 10, 1803 in Adair, Kentucky, USA1.

More About HARDEN DENHAM and NANCY GOIN:

Marriage: October 10, 1803, Adair, Kentucky, USA1

Children of HARDEN DENHAM are:

9. i. DAVID3 DENHAM, b. 1794.

10. ii. LEE R. DENHAM, b. 1796.

Generation No. 3

4. ROLIN H.3 DENHAM (DAVID2, DAVID1) was born June 12, 1813 in Tennessee. He married MAHALA WILLIAMS. She was born April 1818 in Virginia, and died in Hancock County, Tennessee.

Notes for ROLIN H. DENHAM:

1850 U.S. Census records Rolin H. Denham, age 37, born in Tennessee and wife Mahala, age 26, born in Virgina, living in Hancock County, Tennessee, with three children; Eliza Ann (8), Rachel E. (6), and David (2). [Micro film page 107]

1860 U.S. Census records Roland Denham, (mechanic) age 57 (age should be 47), born in Tennessee and wife Mahala, age 36, born in Virginia, living in Tazewell,Claiborne, County, Tennessee, with six children; Eliza Ann (15), Rachel E. (13), Squire W. (9), William (7), Nancy (5), and Susan (6 mo.) All children were listed as born in Tennessee. David is noticeably absent from the list of children. He is assumed to have died between the years 1850 and 1860.

1870 U.S. Census records Rolen Denham, (house carpenter) age 56 born in Virginia and wife Mahala, age 47, (housekeeper) born in Virginia, living in Knoxville, Tennessee, six children; William (16) (carpenter), Nancy (14), Susan (12), Mary (8), Phillip (7) and Charles (1). All the children were listed as born in Tennessee. It is assumed that the three older children had already left home.

Monday, Jul 3, 1876

"The State vs R. H. Denham & Catharine Wampler. Charge: Lewdness. (presentment at

June term 1875, trial & acquital at Feeby term 1876; bill of costs for

$13.75, including Sheriff J G Buttram $3.00 for arrests etc; Scott Hale

$2.00 as witness 2 days, Atty Gen S J A Frazier $2.59)

from Rhea Co., TN

County Court Minue Book

April 1876 - August 1881 (v. 1, p. 12)

abstrcted/transcribed by Bettye J. Broyles

Pub. Rhea Co Hist & Gen Socty

1880 U.S. Census records Rolen, age 66, living in Rhea County, Tennessee, with Catharine Wompler and Wompler children, son, Malind, age 13; son, William, age 10 and son James, age 10.

1890 U.S. Census was destroyed by fire.

1900 U.S. Census does not list a Rolen Denham in Tennessee or Virginia.

In 1895 a R. H. Denham filed an application for a Soldier's Pension as one who had fought during the Civil War and was permanently injured. Address at the time was Mohawk, Greene County, Tennessee. He said that he was born June 12, 1813 in Claiborne County, Tennessee. (this matches information on Rolin H. Denham)

He said he enlisted in July, 1862 and was sworn in at the Appomattox Court House, in Virginia. He was assigned to Company L of the First Regiment of the Tennessee Calvary Volunteers, under Captain William Black. Lieutenants were William Shoemaker and C. Y. Rice. Colonel Carter was Commander of the Regiment.

He says, "I was not wounded in battle, but, was injured by a fall from a tree." This happened on or about the time Colonel Frazier was in the Cumberland Gap in 1862. He said, "I contracted chronic diarrhea and infection of the spine." He later claims to have contracted rheumatism in the lower extremities and diseases of kidneys and urinary organs and bowels.

He says he was discharged at the expiration of his term of service. (no date given)

He also says that he lost the use of his right hand from an accident in boyhood and then about 1870, he lost his thumb and forefinger, of his left hand, in a steam saw accident. (1870 census records Rolen as a house carpenter)

At the time of his application, he said that he had been married, but was not at the present.

His application was denied.

Notes for MAHALA WILLIAMS:

Prior to the Civil War there were several families in Western Virginia who claimed Indian descent. They claimed to have lived on top of the Blue Ridge Mountains before the Revolutionary War. One of the more prominate family names was Williams.

Mahala is thought to be a daughter of Charles and Rebecca Williams. (not proven)

The U. S. Census of 1880 shows Mahala (spelled Mahaly) (54), living with her daughter Susan and her husband, Hilton Bell in Hancock County, Tennessee. The census taker misspelled her last name as Denum. (Records show later that Mary was married to Hilton, not Susan.)

It was noticed by this writer that there were at least 3 families of WILLIAMS that lived around Mahala on the census roll. They qualified in age to be Mahala's brothers.

The U.S. Census of 1890 was destroyed by fire.

The U.S. Census of 1900 records Haley Denum (82) white female, born in Virginia, as well as both her parents, living alone in Hancock County, Tennessee. (Within 4 houses of her daughter Mary Denham Bell) and having had 11 children, 8 of whom were still living at that time. She could not read or write.

Since Mahala does not appear on the 1910 census, she is thought to have died before 1910. No date has been established for her death or place for her burial. She is thought to have died in Hancock County, TN.

Children of ROLIN DENHAM and MAHALA WILLIAMS are:

11. i. ELIZA ANN4 DENHAM, b. August 30, 1841, Hancock County, Tennessee; d. July 24, 1919, Cumberland Gap, TN..

12. ii. RACHOL E. DENHAM, b. September 29, 1844, Hancock County, Tennessee; d. November 29, 1936, Hamilton County, Tennessee.

iii. DAVID DENHAM, b. 1848, Hancock County, Tennessee; d. Bet. 1850 - 1860, Hancock County, Tennessee.

Notes for DAVID DENHAM:

David is listed as two years old on the 1850 U.S. Census with his parents. He is absent from the list of family names in the U.S. Census of 1860. It is supposed that he died during that ten year time span. The parents also moved during that time from Hancock County to Claiborne County.

13. iv. SQUIRE WILLIAM DENHAM, b. June 27, 1850, Hancock County, Tennessee; d. March 23, 1940, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

14. v. WILLIAM M. DENHAM, b. October 22, 1852, Hancock County, Tennessee; d. July 31, 1934, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

15. vi. NANCY DENHAM, b. July 1853, Virginia.

vii. SUSAN DENHAM, b. 1860, Claiborne County; m. MILTON BELL; b. January 08, 1852, Claiborne County.

Notes for SUSAN DENHAM:

Susan's Mother, Mahala Denham, and her sister, Nancy Denham and her son, Flem, one year old, was living with them in the U. S. Census of 1880. The census taker spelled Denham, Denim. It is assumed that no one in the household could read or write.

The census records Susan as wife of Hilton Bell. Twin brother of her sister Mary's husband. This has to be a mistake on the part of the census taker. Susan has to be the wife of Milton Bell. (see notes on Mary J. Denham)

Susan is recorded as being 15 years old and keeping house. (This writer feels that her age is recorded wrong; she should be at least 20 or 21 years old.) He is listed as a farm hand and her as keeping house, living in Hancock County, Tennessee. Also living with them at the time was her Mother, Mahala (54) and her sister Nancy (23).

It is assumed that she died in the 1880's. The census of 1900 list Nancy Denham as Nancy Bell, 46 years old and a widow.

Hilton and Milton's family was listed in the U. S. Census of 1860 as Mulatto. That is, descendants of racially mixed parents. This entire family unit is listed in the 1880 census as Black???

Notes for MILTON BELL:

See notes on his father, Bennet Bell.

Milton Bell is listed as a Registered Voter in 1891, District 8 Hancock County, TN.

16. viii. MARY JANE DENHAM, b. August 1863, Claiborne County, Tennessee.

17. ix. PHILLIP DENHAM, b. 1863, Claiborne County; d. April 18, 1930, Sneedville, Hancock County Tennessee.

x. CHARLES DENHAM, b. 1869, Knox County, Tennessee.

5. FETNEY3 DENHAM (DAVID2, DAVID1) was born 1815 in Tennessee.

Notes for FETNEY DENHAM:

U.S. Census 1850 Hancock County, TN.

Evaline Denham (33) and sister Fetney Denham (35) living with children, which are assumed Fetney's since they all appear with Fetney on the 1860 census without Evaline. Daughter Malissa E. (10), James M. (8), Maryann (6), Mandy Jane (4) and William (6/12).

1860 Tennessee Census (p. 144) lists Fetney Denham (46) living with her children: Malissa (20) doing spinning work, James (18) farm hand, Mary Ann (15) doing housework, Manda (12) doing housework, Robert (10), John (4), and Sarah Ann (1). All born in Tennessee, all listed as Mulatto and owned real estate worth $400.

It is believed that Fetney had no known husband and that her children had different fathers.

Children of FETNEY DENHAM are:

i. MALISSA4 DENHAM, b. 1840.

ii. JAMES M. DENHAM, b. 1842.

iii. MARY ANN DENHAM, b. 1845.

iv. MANDA JANE DENHAM, b. 1848.

v. ROBERT DENHAM, b. 1850.

vi. JOHN DENHAM, b. 1856, Tennessee.

vii. SARAH ANN DENHAM, b. 1859.

Notes for SARAH ANN DENHAM:

Records indicate that she may have died before 1870

6. CAROLINE3 DENHAM (DAVID2, DAVID1) was born 1824.

Notes for CAROLINE DENHAM:

Caroline had no known husband, either by census or family records. Her birthplace is listed as Virginia on the U.S. Census.

U.S. Census lists Caroline (36) as living in Claiborne County, TN. (same as her brother Rolen) in 1860

with her children James (13), Susan (11) and Edward (6).

Children of CAROLINE DENHAM are:

i. SARAH ANN4 DENHAM, b. 1844.

ii. JAMES D. DENHAM, b. 1847.

iii. SUSAN DENHAM, b. 1849.

7. MILDRED3 DENHAM (DAVID2, DAVID1) was born 1826 in Virginia. She married LUNDER FUGATE January 31, 1867 in Virginia. He died Abt. 1900.

Notes for MILDRED DENHAM:

1860 Tennessee Census lists Mildred Denham (35) working as a weaver, living on Mulberry Creek with her children: Nancy (14) b. TN, William (12) b. TN, Margaret (8) b. TN, twins Mary & Martha (6) b. VA, and Clementine(1) b. TN. Also living with her was Fanny Denham (72) b. NC, mother-in-law (this writer believes Fanny to be her mother. All persons listed as Mulatto.

Notes for LUNDER FUGATE:

Lunder Fugate's children by a previous wife was Lee, Carry and Smith

More About LUNDER FUGATE and MILDRED DENHAM:

Marriage: January 31, 1867, Virginia

Children of MILDRED DENHAM and LUNDER FUGATE are:

i. OLIVER DENHAM4 FUGATE, b. 1841; m. JULIA HARMON, January 05, 1865; b. Tennessee.

Notes for OLIVER DENHAM FUGATE:

Oliver and Julia had no known children. In the 1870 census they were living in Meremac Township, Crawford County, MO. They were listed as white race. He enlisted in the Union Army as Oliver Denham as served as sergent in the 9th and 10th Missouri Calvaries. He is also listed in the 1870 Tax Book for Crawford County, MO.

More About OLIVER FUGATE and JULIA HARMON:

Marriage: January 05, 1865

ii. NANCY DENHAM, b. 1846, Tennessee; m. PASCAL COLLINS, September 27, 1866, Claiborne County, Tennessee.

Notes for NANCY DENHAM:

Nancy and Pascal are listed on the census of Palo Pinto County, Texas in 1880. Listed as white race.

More About PASCAL COLLINS and NANCY DENHAM:

Marriage: September 27, 1866, Claiborne County, Tennessee

iii. WILLIAM R. DENHAM, b. 1848.

Notes for WILLIAM R. DENHAM:

In all likelyhood he died as an infant or young child.

18. iv. MARGARET DENHAM, b. 1852, Tennessee; d. June 21, 1931, Horton, Brown County, Kansas.

v. MARTHA FUGATE, b. 1854.

vi. MARY FUGATE, b. 1854.

vii. CLEMENTINE FUGATE, b. 1859.

8. WILLOBY3 DENHAM (DAVID2, DAVID1) was born 1827 in Hancock County, Tennessee. He married (1) JANE UNKNOWN. She was born 1840. He married (2) ELIZABETH UNKNOWN. She was born Abt. 1818.

Notes for WILLOBY DENHAM:

Willoby Denham, from family history, was married at least twice.

Willoby does not appear on either the 1850 or 1860 Tennessee census.

U.S. Census 1870 lists Willoby Denham (45) living in Hancock County, TN.

U.S. Census 1880 lists Willoby Denham (56) born in TN. White male living in Hancock County, TN. with

wife Jane (40) born in Tn. and children Emily (3) TN. and David F. 10 months born in TN.

Willobey Denham is listed as a Registered Voter in 1891, District 8 of Hancock County, TN.

Children of WILLOBY DENHAM and JANE UNKNOWN are:

19. i. FRANK4 DENHAM.

ii. EMILY DENHAM, b. 1876.

iii. DAVID F. DENHAM, b. 1879.

Children of WILLOBY DENHAM and ELIZABETH UNKNOWN are:

iv. LUCINDA4 DENHAM, b. 1840.

v. CRISPIN DENHAM, b. 1842.

vi. WILLIAM DENHAM, b. 1849.

vii. STOKELY DENHAM, b. 1852.

viii. ORLENDA DENHAM, b. 1857.

ix. SERENA DENHAM, b. 1858.

x. NATHANIEL DENHAM, b. 1861.

9. DAVID3 DENHAM (HARDEN2, DAVID1) was born 1794.

Children of DAVID DENHAM are:

i. THOMAS JEFFERSON4 DENHAM, b. 1824.

20. ii. JOHN DENHAM, b. 1828.

iii. GEORGE W. DENHAM, b. 1833.

iv. AMY DENHAM, b. 1834.

v. DAVID DENHAM, b. 1836.

vi. GRANDVILLE DENHAM, b. 1839.

vii. REMUS DENHAM, b. 1840.

viii. JOSEPH DENHAM, b. 1849.

ix. MARY MILINDA DENHAM, b. 1850.

x. HARRIETT DENHAM, b. 1851.

xi. JAMES DENHAM, b. 1852.

xii. WILLIAM SANFORD DENHAM, b. 1860.

10. LEE R.3 DENHAM (HARDEN2, DAVID1) was born 1796.

Child of LEE R. DENHAM is:

i. JULIA ANN4 DENHAM.

 

 


 

 

State of Tennessee

Hawkins Couty

 

On this first day of December, 1834, personally appeared before me, John I. Walling, one of the justices of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for said county, David Denham, aged about 80 years old, who first being duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration…: About the 26th day of August 1778, he entered the service of the United States by volunteering in the County of Guilford and state of North Carolina in the company commanded by Captain John Leak of the regiment of militia commanded by Colonel James Martin and Major Pasely and was marched to Salisbury at which place General Rutherford was commander and from Salisbury he was marched to Cathey’s Fort on the Catawba River and being stationed there two months, he was marched to the Indian towns near the head of the Tennessee River where he was discharged by his said captain and colonel which was about the 10th day of February 1779, and in about returning home, his said captain prevailed on him to continue in service three months longer. This declarant  did then volunteer under his said captain, John Leak, of the militia and Colonel Martin, which was about the 12th of February 1779, he entered the service of the United States and was marched to the frontiers of South Carolina and North Carolina and Virginia, serving in turns around the frontiers of those states until about the 14th of May, 1779, and on the 15th day of May he was discharged by his said captain and colonel and returned home having served nine months and was discharged in writing, as he believes, at Cathey’s Fort, North Carolina. This declarant states about the 15th of August, 1779, he entered the service of the United States by volunteering in the said county of Guilford and state of North Carolina in the company commanded by Captain Sevier of the militia commanded by Colonel Holston and from Guilford County was marched to the Long Islands of Holston, and from the Long Islands of Holston, he was marched to the frontiers of North Carolina to an Indian town, and he was in a battle with the Indians, in which battle there was thirty Indians killed and twenty taken prisoners; and from there he was marched to the frontier s of South Carolina and North Carolina, and he was discharged at Wilmington, North Carolina, having served six months, which was about the 18th of February, 1780 and returned home.

This declarant states about the 12th day of September, 1780, he entered the service of the United States volunteering in the said county of Guilford [once again it was from Washington County, notGuilford], in the company commanded by Captain Elijah Witt of the militia commanded by Colonel John Sevier and Major Walton, and he marched with the intention of being in the expected battle of the British at King’s Mountain, which did take place about the 24th of September, 1780. This declarant states about the 23rd of the said month September, he was wounded by the kick of a horse which prevented his being in the Battle of King’s Mountain. This declarant states he then continued in service until about 14th of March, 1781, when he was discharged in writing and returned home, making six months.

This declarant states sometime about the 14th of July 1781, he entered the service of the United States by volunteering in the said county of Guilford and was marched under the command of Captain Elijah Witt of the militia commanded by Colonel John Sevier and Major Walton, and was marched again to the frontiers of South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina, guarding the frontiers of those states until about the 20th of January, 1782, when he was discharged. This declarant states that sometime about the 14th of March he entered the service of the United States six other months under the command of the said Captain Elijah Witt, who was commanded by Colonel John Sevier and Major Walton, guarding the frontiers of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina until ___ of September 1782, when he was discharged in Washington County, state of North Carolina. This declarant state that about the 1st of March he again volunteered under the above named officers and served six other months and was discharged by his officers in Washington County, state of North Carolina, which was about the 3rd day of August, 1783, when he was discharged in writing, making altogether, three years and 3 months, which last tour he was discharged in Washington County, and states he was acquainted with Generals Lawson and Stephens, and Colonels Preston and Lynch, and Generals Butler, Eaton and Rutherford of North Carolina and Virginia who commanded the militia from their states, and with General Greene of the regular army, and he is acquainted with James Gilbert, clergyman for the counties of Claiborne and Hawkins. He is also acquainted with ChristianPearson and E. S. Goodman, and he was born in Louisa County, state of Virginia, and he has no recordof his age, and was living in North Carolina when first called into service, and he received a written discharge as before stated, but they have long since been lost or mislaid so that he cannot produce them. And he hereby Relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity Except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

Sworn to and subcribed to the day and year aforesaid
David Denham  His Mark

 

Hancock County, Tennessee-

On this 2nd day of July, 1852, personally appeared before the justice of the peace, Fanny Denham, aged about 80 years, a resident of Hancock County, state of Tennessee, having been first duly sworn according to law, declares that she is the widow of David Denham, deceased, who was a private in the company of Captain Leak and Colonel James Martin in the Revolutionary War about 1778-1779. She further declares that she was married to the said David Denham in September 1811 in Hawkins County, Tennessee by Thomas McKnelly? a minister of the Gospel. That her husband aforesaid, David Denham, died on or about the 14th day of June 1850, and that she has remained a widow since that time, and is now a widow and that her name before her said marriage was Fanny Lucas . That she nor her said husband never kept any record in writing of the dates and other facts of the said marriage…


On this 11th day of November, 1833 personally appeared in open court before the worshipful justices now sitting, Harden Denham, a resident citizen of the county of Jackson in the state of Tennessee, aged 73 past, since the last day of June last past, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration…: 

He entered the service of the United States, first a tour of two months in a regiment commanded by Colonel John Sevier. His captain was called George Russell, Lieutenant William Beam [or Bean]. As to the precise date of entering on this tour he cannot state. It was in the fall season of the year. 

.............................Shortly after this he was discharged. He does not recollect that he got any written discharge. He returned home. On this tour he went out as a substitute for his brother David Denham and served his full time.
Again he entered the service in Washington County, North Carolina for a term of two months; joined a company commanded by Captain Thomas Hardeman and the company joined the regiment commanded by Colonel John Sevier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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